Problems linger despite Tunisian revolution

Many of the very people who began the uprising feel the reasons for their revolt are being ignored.

    It was the self-immolation of a young Tunisian man that sparked the uprising that has spread across the Arab world.

    However, months after the revolution that brought down 23 years of authoritarian rule, the struggle in Tunisia is far from over, as Al Jazeera's Nazanine Moshiri reports from Sidi Bouzid.

    Local resident Mohamed Bouazizi's desperate gesture might have ignited the uprising. But it was years of state oppression, poverty and unemployment that really inspired people to protest.

    Zine El Abidine Ben Ali is no longer the president, but the central-west region remains one of the poorest parts of Tunisia.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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