Benin sorcery laws 'not possible'

Al Jazeera looks at the practice of sorcery in the West African state especially among children

    Sorcery fuelled by superstition are deep-rooted in the west African state of Benin.

    Even children are not immune, and protecting children accused of witchcraft is difficult, because the government has said that child witches do exist.

    In the second part of Al Jazeera's coverage on sorcery and witchcraft in Benin, Charles Stratford reports on its impact on children.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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