Aus Open: Thursday's order of play

World number one Novak Djokovic takes centre stage at the Rod Laver arena on day four of the Australian Open.

    Defending champion Novak Djokovic takes on Santiago Giraldo in his quest for the Aussie title [GETTY]

    Order of play for the main showcourts on Thursday 19 January at the Australian Open in Melbourne. A full schedule of play can be found here.

    Rod Laver Arena 11:00 am (0000 GMT)

    • Jamie Hampton (USA) v Maria Sharapova (RUS No 4)

    Not Before 12:30 pm

    • Barbora Zahlavova Strycova (CZE) v Serena Williams (USA  No 12)
    • Novak Djokovic (SRB No 1) v Santiago Giraldo (COL)

    Not before 7:00 pm

    • Jelena Dokic (AUS) v Marion Bartoli (FRA No 9)

    Followed by

    • Lleyton Hewitt (AUS) v Andy Roddick (USA No 15)

    Hisense Arena 11:00 am

    • Michaella Krajicek (NED) v Ana Ivanovic (SRB No21)

    Followed by

    • Ricardo Mello (BRA) v Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (FRA No 6)
    • Carla Suarez Navarro (ESP) v Petra Kvitova (CZE No 2)
    • Andy Murray (GBR No 4) v Edouard Roger-Vasselin (FRA)

    Margaret Court Arena 11:00 am

    • Vera Zvonareva (RUS No 7) v Lucie Hradecka (CZE)

    Followed by

    • Janko Tipsarevic (SRB No 9) v James Duckworth (AUS)
    • Matthew Ebden (AUS) v Kei Nishikori (JPN No 24)

    Not before 7:00pm

    • Thomaz Bellucci (BRA) v Gael Monfils (FRA No 14)

    Show Court 2 11:00 am

    • Sara Errani (ITA) v Nadia Petrova (RUS No 29)

    Followed by

    • Ryan Sweeting (USA) v David Ferrer (ESP No 5)
    • Sabine Lisicki (GER No 14) v Shahar Peer (ISR)
    • Viktor Troicki (SRB No 19) v Mikhail Kukushkin (KAZ)

    Show Court 3 11:00 am

    • Milos Raonic (CAN No 23) v Philipp Petzschner (GER)

    Followed by

    • Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (RUS No 15) v Vania King (USA)
    • Andrey Golubev (KAZ) v Richard Gasquet (FRA No 17)
    • Sloane Stephens (USA) v Svetlana Kuznetsova (RUS No 18)

    SOURCE: AFP


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