CSKA charged with racist behaviour

Russian champions also face UEFA charge over crowd disorder with a decision expected by the body on October 3.

    Manchester City's Yaya Toure (centre) was subjected to racist chanting last season [AP]
    Manchester City's Yaya Toure (centre) was subjected to racist chanting last season [AP]

    UEFA has charged CSKA Moscow with racist behaviour by fans at a Champions League match for the third time in a year.

    The Russian champion also faces charges over crowd disorder which halted play during a 5-1 loss at Roma last week, UEFA said in a statement.

    Fans clashed with riot police at the Olympic Stadium, and the match was stopped for two minutes in the second half.

    UEFA said its disciplinary panel will deal with the case on October 3.

    CSKA Moscow has now been charged with racist behaviour by its fans at three of its past five matches in Europe's marquee competition.

    UEFA already ordered CSKA to play Bayern Munich in an empty Arena Khimki stadium next Tuesday as an escalating punishment for offenses committed last season.

    Not the first time

    Manchester City captain Yaya Toure directed the match referee to home fans making monkey noises during a Champions League match last October.

    Then, CSKA and senior Russian football officials denied the abuse happened, and suggested a British conspiracy against the 2018 World Cup host nation. UEFA closed a section of the stadium for a subsequent home match against Bayern.

    Last December, UEFA charged CSKA for fans displaying far-right symbols at a match at Viktoria Plzen, and imposed the stadium closure at its first home Champions league game this season.

    In the latest case, CSKA and Roma face further UEFA sanctions for fans lighting flares and throwing missiles.


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