Man Utd splash out $99m on Di Maria

Red Devils announce British transfer record, but are later thrashed 4-0 by the MK Dons in the Capital One Cup.

    Man Utd splash out $99m on Di Maria
    Angel Di Maria's move to Manchester United shatters the $81m Chelsea paid for Fernando Torres [Getty Images]

    Manchester United have broken the British transfer record by signing Angel Di Maria from Real Madrid for $99m, as the club suffers its worst start to a season in more than 20 years. 

    The 26-year-old's move on Tuesday, on a five-year contract, shatters the previous British record fee of $81m paid by Chelsea to sign Spain striker Fernando Torres from Liverpool in 2011.

    The announcement came hours before the Red Devils were thrashed 4-0 in the Capital One Cup by the MK Dons, a team from the third tier of English football.

    "Manchester United is delighted to announce that Angel Di Maria has completed his transfer for a British record fee of $99m," a club statement said.

    Di Maria was one of Madrid's key players last season when the Spanish team became European champions for a 10th time. He rejected the offer of a new contract during the close season and asked to leave.

    "I have thoroughly enjoyed my time in Spain and there were a lot of clubs interested in me, but United is the only club that I would have left Real Madrid for," Di Maria said.

    Spending spree

    Di Maria's move takes United's spending to about $215m in the summer transfer window as England's most successful club seeks to revive its fortunes under new manager Louis van Gaal. 

    Van Gaal, has already bought England left-back Luke Shaw, Spanish midfielder Ander Herrera and Di Maria's Argentina team-mate, Marcos Rojo.

    Manchester United lost three defenders in the summer - Rio Ferdinand, Nemanja Vidic and Patrice Evra - an area that has looked vulnerable in a 2-1 home loss to Swansea and a 1-1 draw at Sunderland in the two league games so far in the Dutchman's reign.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    A relatively new independence and fresh waves of conflict inspire a South Sudanese refugee to build antiwar video games.