FIFA lifts ban on head covers

Players will now be able to wear a hijab or turban during football matches, according to the sport's governing body.

    The hijab or the turban will need to be of the same colour as the team jersey [AFP]
    The hijab or the turban will need to be of the same colour as the team jersey [AFP]

    Football's world governing body FIFA has authorised the wearing of head covers for religious purposes during matches.

    That will allow female Muslim players who wear a hijab in everyday life to cover their heads during matches as well. FIFA added that male players will also be authorised to do so following a request from the Sikh community in Canada.

    "It was decided that female players can cover their heads to play," said FIFA Secretary-General Jerome Valcke at a meeting of the International Football Association Board (IFAB), the sport's lawmakers, in Zurich.

    "It was decided that male players can play with head cover too," he said, although they will not be the same as those worn day to day.

    "It will be a basic head cover and the colour should be the same as the team jersey."

    The wearing of head covers had been banned until 2012, with FIFA saying that they posed too great a risk of injury to the head or neck. However, the IFAB then allowed them to be tested out over a two-year period following a request from the Asian Football Confederation (AFC), a trial which proved to be successful.

    "It's a worldwide authorisation," said Valcke, who confirmed that the hosting of the 2016 women's under-17 World Cup by the Arab kingdom of Jordan played a part in the authorisation being introduced.

    "It was a plus for them to have authorisation from the IFAB for women to be able to play (wearing head covers). It was a request from these (Muslim) countries that said it would help support women's football there."


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