Anelka sacked by West Brom

Premier League club issues statement saying they are terminating the striker's contract for gross misconduct.

    Nicolas Anelka was punished for his gestures against West Ham in December [AFP]
    Nicolas Anelka was punished for his gestures against West Ham in December [AFP]

    West Bromwich Albion have given French striker Nicolas Anelka notice they are terminating his contract for gross misconduct, the Premier League club said in a statement.

    Anelka, who was given a five-match ban by the FA following his controversial 'quenelle' salute during a match on December 28, had earlier said on Twitter he was quitting the Midlands team.

    "The club considers the conduct of Nicolas Anelka on December 28, coupled with his purported termination on social media this evening, to be gross misconduct," West Brom said. "As a result the club has tonight written to Nicolas Anelka giving him 14 days' notice of termination as required under his contract."

    Anelka, who turned 35 on Friday, made the 'quenelle' salute, which is associated with anti-Semitic sentiments, when he scored the first of his two goals in a 3-3 draw in a league game at West Ham United's Upton Park ground.

    Earlier on Friday, the former France striker tweeted that he was quitting the club but West Brom said they had not received any official notification of his intention to end his contract.

    "Following my talks with the club I've been told I could be back in the squad under certain conditions that I can't agree," Anelka said on his Twitter account (@anelkaofficiel).

    "As I want to preserve my integrity I've decided to free myself and to put an end to my contract with WBA with immediate effect."

    SOURCE: Reuters


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