Don't ban bouncers, says Sehwag

Banning short-pitched deliveries will be unfair on batsmen, according to Indian batsman Virendar Sehwag.

    There will not be any fun left in the game without bouncers, according to Sehwag [Getty Images]
    There will not be any fun left in the game without bouncers, according to Sehwag [Getty Images]

    Banning bouncers following the death of Australia's Phillip Hughes would be unfair on bowlers because batsmen always have the option of ducking under short-pitched deliveries, former India opener Virender Sehwag said.

    Hughes, who would have been 26 at the weekend, died last Thursday from an injury caused by a ball striking him on the back of the head during a domestic match, triggering a huge outpouring of grief in Australia and around the world.

    Restricting Sehwag in full flow has been a very difficult task for bowlers over the years but the 36-year-old, who has scored two triple centuries in tests, feels there should be no clampdown on bouncers.

    "It was very sad that Hughes died in such a way. But it's part of cricket and injuries are part of any sport," Sehwag told reporters. "You have an option to duck bouncers as a batsman. If you cut out the bouncers, then there is no fun left in the game and it's already a batsman's game.

    "I have been hit on the helmet by quite a few bouncers. But it's a weapon for the bowlers so they should not be robbed off it."

    SOURCE: Reuters


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