Vijay leads India charge in second Test in SA

Murali Vijay on 91 not out during the opening day of the second Test against South Africa, as India reach 181 for 1.

    India's Murali Vijay  shared a 140-run partnership with Cheteshwar Pujara [AFP]
    India's Murali Vijay shared a 140-run partnership with Cheteshwar Pujara [AFP]

    India have taken advantage of a placid first-day Test pitch at at Kingsmead to move comfortably to 181-1 against South Africa's toiling bowlers, before bad light ended play.

    During the opening day of the second Test match on Thursday, India's Murali Vijay and Cheteshwar Pujara made unbeaten half-centuries.

    The pair shared an unbroken and relatively untroubled 140-run partnership for the second wicket to put India in control early in the deciding match of the short two-game series.

    Vijay was 91 not out and approaching a century and Pujara 58 not out as India batted through the second and the curtailed third sessions without losing a wicket.

    India's decision to bat first proved to be the correct call.

    "The talk is that this was going to be a pretty flat one," India bowling coach Joe Dawes said.

    "We knew that it was going to be something you want to get in on, bat well and bat first."

    Winner-take-all

    Morne Morkel had South Africa's only breakthrough before lunch when Shikhar Dhawan edged to Alviro Petersen at slip for 29 and 41-1, but Vijay and Pujara batted confidently for the best part of 48 overs after that as even overcast conditions through much of the afternoon in Durban did not offer any real help for the bowlers.

    After the first Test draw in Johannesburg, it is winner-take-all in the second match between top-ranked South Africa and number two India.

    Vijay and the in-form Pujara, who made 153 in the second innings of the drawn first test at the Wanderers, added 87 between lunch and tea and then another 18 runs after tea with only eight overs of the final session possible before bad light took the players off in mid-afternoon.

    They were rarely in trouble and completely blunted South Africa's fast bowlers on a tame track.

    Morkel said that his team just needed to deal with the conditions.

    "It's going to be tough to strike," Morkel said.

    "It's crucial we have a strong mindset now."

    SOURCE: AP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.