Swann keeps England's Ashes hopes alive

Graeme Swann's flying catch dismisses Australia's George Bailey minutes before the end of the second Test opening day.

    England's Graeme Swann of  celebrates with captain Alastair Cook after dismissing Chris Rogers [Getty Images]
    England's Graeme Swann of celebrates with captain Alastair Cook after dismissing Chris Rogers [Getty Images]

    A leaping catch by Graeme Swann in the final minutes of play has kept England in contention against Australia on the opening day of the second Ashes Test in Adelaide.

    The Australians, one-up in the series, looked in control at 257 for four nearing stumps on Thursday, before Swann held a flying catch two-handed at square leg to dismiss the dangerous George Bailey for 53.

    Bailey had looked set for a substantial score batting with skipper Michael Clarke before he hooked paceman Stuart Broad to Swann, whose brilliant piece of outfielding swung the pendulum towards England on a first day of thrust and parry.

    At the close, Australia, after winning the toss, were 273-5 with Clarke, who boasts a ground average of more than 100, on 48 and Brad Haddin on seven.

    It could have been even better for England. Michael Carberry at backward point dropped a sitter off Haddin shortly before the close.

    Crucial wickets

    "I think it's a fairly even day,"  Swann said. 

    "Having lost the toss at Adelaide you always fear the worst as a bowler but I think five wickets in a day is a pretty
    good return.

    "Obviously, six or seven wickets would have been a lot better. We missed a couple of half-chances that we'll rue, but if we turn up in the morning and take a couple of quick wickets it could all quickly be forgotten."

    Australian all-rounder Shane Watson scored his  21st Test half-century in Adelaide before getting out on 51  [AFP]

    Bailey was in aggressive mood, smashing three sixes, two of them off spinner Monty Panesar and a pull off paceman Broad.

    Panesar put down Bailey, missing a sharp caught and bowled chance when the batsman was on 10 and Clarke survived when a flying Joe Root put him down at midwicket off Swann.

    England had grabbed three crucial wickets to peg Australia back in the half-hour before tea after the home side made a strong start.

    Chris Rogers and Shane Watson put on a century stand for the second wicket before both departed in the space of six balls.

    Then, in the last over before tea, recalled spinner Panesar bowled Steve Smith for six to put England on top in a Test they cannot afford to lose in the five-Test series.

    Watson once again missed out on a big score after making a solid start when he was caught and bowled by Jimmy Anderson for 51.

    The all-rounder looked well set after 160 minutes at the crease before he chipped a return catch low down to Anderson on the bowler's follow-through.

    Watson put on 121 runs for the second wicket with Rogers. It was his 21st Test half-century but highlighted his poor conversion rate with just three centuries.

    Broad breakthrough

    Rogers followed five balls later, attempting to hit Swann through the covers only to be caught behind by Matt Prior for 72 off 167 balls with 11 fours.

    It was the seventh time Swann has dismissed left-hander Rogers in Tests, but it was a big improvement for the opener after low scores in the first Test in Brisbane.

    Broad made an early breakthrough for England, removing dangerous opener David Warner before lunch.

    Warner, who scored a century in Australia's 381-run win in the series opener in Brisbane, set off at a cracking pace with 29 off 32 balls before he went after a wide Broad delivery and was caught by Carberry at point.

    England made two changes to their side following the departure of batsman Jonathan Trott with a stress-related illness.

    Root was elevated to Trott's spot and England gave Durham all-rounder Ben Stokes his first Test cap, while Panesar was included in a twin-spin attack with Swann.

    SOURCE: AFP


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