West Indies and Bangladesh draw first Test

The first Test between Bangladesh and West Indies ends in a draw with debutant Elias Sunny named man of the match.

    Bangladeshi batsman Shahriar Nafees raises his bat after scoring a half century on day five [AFP] 

    The rain-affected first Test between Bangladesh and West Indies ended in a draw on Tuesday after the tourists declined to chase down 226 for victory.

    West Indies reached 100 for two when the two captains agreed a draw. More than two days of play were lost because of rain and a damp outfield.

    Debutant left-arm spinner Elias Sunny, who took six wickets in the first innings, struck again in the first over by trapping Kraigg Brathwaite leg before.

    Lendl Simmons and Kirk Edwards shared a half-century stand before Simmons was caught by Rubel Hossain at long on off Shakib Al Hasan for 44.

    Edwards (28 not out) and Darren Bravo (24 not out) dug in until the draw was called.

    Bangladesh had declared their second innings on 119 for three with Shahriar Nafees making 50 off 91 balls.

    Sunny was named man of the match for his six for 94 figures in the first innings that helped dismiss the tourists for 244.

    West Indies skipper Darren Sammy made an entertaining 58 off 43 balls, bashing eight fours and two sixes, before being bowled by Shakib.

    Sunny notched his fifth wicket in the third over of the morning when he had overnight batsman Marlon Samuels caught by Raqibul Hasan at short cover for 24. 

    SOURCE: Reuters


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