PCB suspends banned trio contracts

Pakistan's disgraced cricketers Butt, Amir and Asif dropped by cricket board.

    Former captain Salman Butt must now wait until a hearing by the anti-corruption tribunal to judge the fixing case [GALLO/GETTY]

    Salman Butt, Mohammed Amir and Mohammed Asif have had their central contracts suspended by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) while they are being investigated for alleged spot-fixing during the recent tour to England.

    A senior official of the PCB said on Wednesday that the central contracts of the three players stood suspended from November 1, in line with the International Cricket Council's (ICC) anti-corruption code.

    Butt and Amir's appeals against indefinite suspensions were rejected by the ICC last week. Asif had withdrawn his appeal. Their next stage is a hearing by the anti-corruption tribunal into the fixing case.

    "Their contracts were active until the appeal hearing but once their initial appeals were rejected under the ICC code we can't keep them on contracts," the PCB's Zakir Khan said.

    Eligibility

    PCB legal advisor Tafazzul Rizvi said the contracts were suspended because the players were not eligible to play for Pakistan.

    "We only give contracts to players who can play for Pakistan. Until their cases are decided... they can't get any benefits from the board in terms of contracts," he said.

    The ICC suspended the three on September 2 after a British tabloid accused them of accepting money for bowling predetermined no-balls in a Test against England at Lord's in late August.

    Asif and Butt were in category A of the central contracts and were receiving a monthly salary of $2,950 from PCB. Amir was in category B on a monthly salary of $2,100.

    The central contracts were awarded in March and were in effect from January 1- December 31, 2010.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.