Kubica leaves hospital after crash

Formula One Renault driver Robert Kubica discharged from hospital eleven weeks after serious rallying accident.

    Doctors believe Kubica will not return to the track for at least six months following the crash [Reuters]

    Formula One driver Robert Kubica has left hospital nearly three months after a rallying accident left him severely injured and ruled out of the 2011 racing season.

    The Renault driver had been at the Santa Corona hospital since the accident in February which left him with serious arm and leg injuries, requiring a series of operations.

    The hospital in the northern Italian town of Pietra Ligure announced the move late on Saturday, saying "his condition is good and the (driver) will begin a new phase of rehabilitation outside of the hospital.''

    Serious injuries

    After the accident on February 6, Polish driver Kubica underwent seven hours of surgery to save his right hand before operations on his shoulder, leg and elbow.

    The accident also ruled him out of the entire 2011 F1 season. He has been replaced by German driver Nick Heidfeld on the Renault team this season.

     

    Kubica was injured during the Ronde di Andora rally in northern Italy.

     

    The Gazzetta dello sport newspaper quoted Doctor Riccardo Ceccarelli as saying Kubica was unlikely to be able to return to the track for another six months.

    There were fears that the 26-year-old driver may never race again, as he could have lost his right hand. But he was optimistic that his hand will continue to improve.

    "I am starting to feel a lot better now. My recovery is moving in the right direction: my strength and weight are increasing day by day and as a result I will leave the Santa Corona hospital very soon," Kubica had told the Renault F1 website on Thursday.

    He also indicated he would undergo further rehabilitation after travelling back to his home in Monaco.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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