CSKA Moscow avoid Uefa ban

Russian club will keep place in Champions League despite doping infraction.

    Ignashevich reportedly had a 'severe cold' requiring Sudafed [GALLO/GETTY]
    CSKA Moscow will not be kicked out of the European Champions League despite two players failing post-match doping tests, Uefa have announced.

    Uefa said the unnamed stimulant found in samples given by defenders Sergei
    Ignashevich and Alexei Berezutsky after a 3-3 draw against English champions Manchester United last month is not serious enough to impose a team punishment.

    The European body's rules allow a maximum penalty of a one-year ban for
    the players if the substance is on the World Anti-Doping Agency's "specified'' list.

    Ignashevich and Berezutsky will have their case heard by Uefa's disciplinary panel on December 17 - one day before CSKA Moscow features in the draw for the knockout round.

    Suspension

    Uefa suspended them from CSKA's match at Turkish champions Besiktas, but the Russians won 2-1 to advance from the group along with United.

    CSKA officials said the club omitted the drug Sudafed from a list of medication it handed to doping officials after its November 3 match at Old Trafford.

    Ignashevich and Berezutsky were fighting off a severe cold after playing for the national team in a World Cup qualifier, the club said.

    The substance is not prohibited but Uefa insists it must be told of its use for therapeutic reasons.

    The players could receive just a warning if Uefa is satisfied that their case was "arising from a positive test for a 'specified' substance.''

    Uefa can banish teams from its competitions if at least two players are caught using a more powerful doping product that is on a list of prohibited, or "nonspecified,'' substances.

    SOURCE: AP


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