Ferrari unveil new car

The defending F1 champions launch their new model.

    Ferrari: The new look for 2008 [AFP]
    Ferrari has presented its 2008 Formula One car, highlighting a series of technical changes and the return of the No. 1 on the red model's nose.

    Kimi Raikkonen earned Ferrari its first driver's championship last season since Michael Schumacher accomplished the feat five consecutive times from 2000-04.

    It was also the squad's first constructor's title since 2004.

    Ferrari has named the car the F2008.

    It is the 54th car the Maranello outfit has built for F1.

    It features a new electronic system called SECU (Standard Electronic Control Unit) that is the same for all F1 teams this season.

    Other new details include a revamped transmission, which must be used for four consecutive races, and more safety features, including lateral guards near the drivers' helmets.

    According to new rules for materials, the car is heavier than last year's edition, weighing in at 605 kilograms, including water, oil and the driver.

    There is also a complete overhaul in aerodynamics, although Ferrari said more changes will be put in place before the first race in Australia in March.

    Raikkonen is scheduled to test the F2008 for the first time on Ferrari's home track in Fiorano on Monday.

    The team then heads to Madonna Di Campiglio in the Italian Dolomites for the squad's annual winter retreat.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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