Timeline: Woolmer's death

A chronology of key events connected to the killing of the Pakistan cricket coach.

    Woolmer was found dead in a Jamaican hotel room [AP]

    March 17

    Woolmer says he "would like to sleep on my future as a coach" after Pakistan's shock defeat to debutants Ireland and exit from the World Cup.
     
    March 18

    After being found unconscious in his hotel room, he is later declared dead in hospital.

    Woolmer's son, Russell, tells a South African radio station that doctors told him the cause of death may have been either stress or a heart attack.
     
    March 19

    The coach's family authorises local authorities in Kingston, Jamaica, to carry out a post mortem.
     
    March 20

    Pakistan Cricket Board says findings from a post mortem were "inconclusive" and further tests were being carried out

    Jamaican police say they are treating the death as "suspicious" and will continue a full investigation.
     
    March 21

    Woolmer's wife, Gill, says she does not suspect foul play in an interview with an Indian news channel.

    Pakistan play their final match at the World Cup against Zimbabwe and dedicate their win to Woolmer.
     
    March 22

    Jamaican police launch a murder investigation into his death, saying "the pathologist's report states that Mr Woolmer's death was due to asphyxia as a result of manual strangulation".

    SOURCE: Agencies


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