Myanmar referendum

We look at how the ruling junta is handling the country's worst natural disaster.


    Watch part two

    On May 2, Cyclone Nargis hit the South East Asian nation of Myanmar.

    Winds of up to 200 kilometers an hour destroyed homes, ripped up power lines and trees and created a 12 foot tidal wave that swept through low-lying villages.

    With the death toll rising and an estimated million people struggling without shelter or water, the ruling military junta has opened its doors to foreign aid.

    But some critics have condemned the Junta for its slow response to the crisis and for not fast-tracking visas for aid workers to enter the country.

    Join 101 East host Teymoor Nabili to discuss Myanmar's unfolding humanitarian crisis with Larry Jagan, a freelance journalist and Myanmar analyst, Soe Aung, a spokesperson for the National Council of the Union of Burma, and Alistair Henley from the International Federation of Red Cross.

    This episode of 101 East aired on Thursday, May 8, 2008.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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