Gaza: 39 straight Fridays of protests

On a new episode of The Take podcast, Al Jazeera journalists discuss the ongoing protests in the besieged Gaza Strip.

    For 39 consecutive weeks, Palestinians have protested near the Israel-Gaza buffer zone as part of the Great March of Return movement.

    Demonstrators, who launched the protests on March 30, are calling for the right of return for Palestinian refugees, under the United Nations Resolution 194, and demanding an end to the 12-year Israeli blockade.

    Since the rallies first began, more than 215 Palestinians have been killed and at least 18,000 others injured by Israeli forces.

    In the season finale of The Take, host Imtiaz Tyab speaks to journalist Stefanie Dekker, who has been covering the protests since the beginning.

    Learn more: 

    Born in Gaza: The deadly blockade

    Why Jerusalem Matters

    Fatah and Hamas will face Trump's deal disunited

    More on Gaza

    The Team:

    This episode was produced by Jasmin Bauomy with help from Morgan Waters, Imtiaz Tyab, Kyana Moghadam and Dina Kesbeh. The show's lead producer is Graelyn Brashear. The sound designer is Ian Coss.

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    SOURCE: Al Jazeera News


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