'No pictures, no words can explain Rohingya plight'

How two Al Jazeera journalists experienced the Rohingya refugee crisis in Bangladesh.

    Myanmar's military crackdown on the country's Rohingya has resulted in the killing of more than 400 men, women and children and has driven hundreds of thousands out of the country.

    More than 500,000 Rohingya refugees are now in Bangladeshi refugee camps. Of them, more than half are in unregistered camps, where food, shelter, drinking water and sanitation are a luxury.

    The refugees carry harrowing stories of mass killings, gang rapes and razing of whole villages, enough to break down even the most seasoned journalists.

    "No pictures, no videos, no writings can explain what is happening over there. It is beyond explanation." - Showkat Shafi

    On the show: Al Jazeera journalists Saif Khalid and Showkat Shafi travelled to Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, to report on the ongoing Rohingya crisis. Our host is Jasmin Bauomy.

    Producer / host: Jasmin Bauomy 
    Audio producer: Laurentiu Colintineanu 
    Platforms & distribution: Mohsin Ali
    Executive producer: Yasir Khan

    READ MORE:
    They look at us with hope, but we can only document their despair
    Cox's Bazar: Chaos all around at Rohingya camps

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    SOURCE: Al Jazeera News


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