The Take: In a new space race, who’s in and who’s out?

The Take examines why some countries are aiming for the moon and beyond.

Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, the International Space Station moves away from the Space Shuttle Atlantis in this digital photograph taken by an Atlantis crew member June 19, 2007
Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, the Space Shuttle Atlantis moves away from the International Space Station in this photograph taken by an Atlantis crew member on June 19, 2007 [File: NASA/Reuters]

Are we entering a new space race? This month, Japan aims to land a probe on the moon’s south pole. If it’s successful, it would be the fifth nation ever to conduct a successful moon landing. Just months earlier, India became the fourth. Is the next generation of the space race heating up, and what will it mean for democratic access to space?

For more: 

Listen to Necessary Tomorrows, a new podcast from Al Jazeera and Doha Debates.

In this episode: 

  • Namrata Goswami (@namygoswami), professor, Thunderbird School of Global Management, Arizona State University

Episode credits:

This episode was produced by Negin Owliaei and our host Malika Bilal. Zaina Badr and Khaled Soltan fact-checked this episode.

Our sound designer is Alex Roldan. Our lead of audience development and engagement is Aya Elmileik, and Adam Abou-Gad is our engagement producer.

Alexandra Locke is The Take’s executive producer, and Ney Alvarez is Al Jazeera’s head of audio.

Connect with us:

@AJEPodcasts on TwitterInstagram, FacebookThreads and YouTube

Source: Al Jazeera