Police kill suspects in northern Saudi Arabia

Interior Ministry says four men shot in eastern Awamiya region were behind the killing of a member of security forces.

    Saudi security forces have killed four armed men in a clash in Awamiya region, the Interior Ministry said.

    The troops raided a hideout for fighters in the eastern Awamiya town and killed the four in an exchange of fire on Saturday, the ministry said.

    The dead, described by the government as terrorists, were behind the killing of a member of the security forces and wounding of another last Sunday, a ministry spokesman quoted by the Saudi state news agency SPA, said.

    Among the dead was the leader of that attack, it said.

    Awamiya has been the focal point of unrest among Saudi Shia since protests in early 2011 calling for an end to perceived discrimination against the minority sect and for democratic reforms in the Sunni monarchy.

    More than 20 people have been killed in the unrest since then, most of them local people shot in incidents that police have described as exchanges of fire.

    Some Shia rights activists say several of those killed were shot dead while peacefully protesting, which the government denies.

    Saudi Shia complain it is harder for them to get government jobs than Sunnis, or to build places of worship.

    The government denies discrimination and has accused Shia activists involved in attacks on security officers or protests as working on behalf of a foreign power, widely understood to mean Iran.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.