Egypt's shifting tide of press freedom

Despite global outrage over the trial of Al Jazeera's journalists, the Egyptian media expressed little sympathy.

    The crackdown on Al Jazeera journalists has raised fears over the future of an independent media brave enough to challenge the Egyptian government's national security narrative.

    Three Al Jazeera journalists, Mohamed Fahmy, Peter Greste and Baher Mohamed, were sentenced to seven years in prison for "spreading false news" and "aiding or joining the banned Muslim Brotherhood". Baher Mohamed received an extra three years for having a used bullet casing in his possession at the time of his arrest.

    The sentences prompted condemnation from Al Jazeera and news agencies across the world.

    Despite the global outrage, local Egyptian media expressed little sympathy for the fate of the journalists.

    A prominent Egyptian TV personality, Ibrahim Eissa, who was once sentenced to prison for the charge of publishing false news, parroted the government’s accusations and supported the verdict.

    Richard Gizbert takes a look at the shifting tide of media freedoms in Egypt.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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