Jordan mulls reforming juvenile law

Replacing prison terms with community service and raising accountability age proposed to improve child protection laws.

    The Jordanian government is considering sweeping changes to its juvenile detention law. More than 2,000 juveniles reside in youth detention centres, most of them convicted for minor crimes like petty theft.

    Most of the detainees suffer from severe depression, prompting the country's social development ministry to urge parliament to approve a draft law that would ease conditions for juveniles.

    Substantial changes, including replacing prison sentences with community service, as well as raising the age of criminal accountability from seven-years-old to 11, have been proposed.

    Legal experts say the amendments would ensure Jordan's child protection laws are compatible with international conventions. 

    Al Jazeera's Nisreen El-Shamaylah reports from Amman.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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