Al Jazeera to take legal action against Egypt

Network says lawyers will go to international courts and the UN over "harassment and intimidation" of its journalists.

    An Al Jazeera map showing one of the buildings from which its signal was jammed [Al Jazeera]
    An Al Jazeera map showing one of the buildings from which its signal was jammed [Al Jazeera]

    Al Jazeera is to take legal action against Egypt's military-backed government over what the media network says is a "sustained campaign of harassment and intimidation" against its journalists in the country.

    The Qatar-based network says that since deposed President Mohammed Morsi was overthrown in July, a large number of its journalists have been arrested and detained, either without charge or on what it calls politically-motivated charges. 

    Al Jazeera's offices have been raided and closed, equipment confiscated, correspondents deported and its transmission jammed by signals coming from military installations.

    In a statement on Thursday, Al Jazeera said it had instructed London-based lawyers, Carter-Ruck, to take action in international courts and before the United Nations to protect its journalists and their right to report from Egypt.

    “Al Jazeera cannot permit this situation to continue. The right of journalists to report freely in situations of this kind is protected by international law and is reaffirmed by UN Security Council Resolution 1738 (2006)," a spokesman said.

    "However, the new regime in Egypt has disregarded this fundamental right and seems determined to silence all independent journalism and reporting in the country, leaving only the voices of its own state-controlled media to be heard."

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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