Rafah crossing closed after Egypt violence

Egyptian authorities shut border crossing with Gaza Strip 'indefinitely' for security reasons day after deadly violence.

    Egypt closes the Rafah border crossing with the Gaza Strip 'indefinitely' for security reasons [AP]
    Egypt closes the Rafah border crossing with the Gaza Strip 'indefinitely' for security reasons [AP]

    Egyptian authorities have closed the Rafah border crossing with the Gaza Strip 'indefinitely' for security reasons after a day of deadly nationwide violence, a security official told AFP news agenncy.

    Hundreds of Palestinian travellers on Thursday were left stranded on both sides of the crossing, the only gateway into the Hamas-ruled Palestinian territory that bypasses Israel, witnesses said.

    The measure follows widespread unrest in Egypt on Wednesday after a bloody crackdown by security forces on loyalists of ousted President Mohamed Morsi.

    The Egyptian authorities closed the border crossing for several days after the military overthrew Morsi on July 3. It later re-opened for four hours a day.

    Hamas, the Palestinian branch of the Muslim Brotherhood, strongly denounced Wednesday's crackdown by security forces on protest camps set up in support of Morsi, who was a member of the political wing of Muslim Brotherhood.

    At least 525 people were killed in violence across Egypt sparked by the crackdown, the health ministry said on Thursday.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    A relatively new independence and fresh waves of conflict inspire a South Sudanese refugee to build antiwar video games.