Deadly wave of car bombs strikes Iraq

At least 46 killed and about 176 injured in coordinated bombings targeting mainly Shia areas in Baghdad and Basra.

    A wave of 13 car bombs has struck mainly Shia areas in and around the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, killing at least 46 people and injuring hundreds more, security and medical officials have said.

    A car bomb also targeted a market in the centre of southern city of Basra killing at least three people on Monday, security sources told Al Jazeera.

    The deadliest of Monday's attacks occurred near a taxi terminal in the city of Kut, 150km southeast of the capital, police said. At least five people were killed and 38 injured when two car bombs blew up.

    Elsewhere, a magnetic "sticky bomb" killed a police captain in Anbar province.

    Four more died in a blast in the town of Mahmoudiya, about 30km south of Baghdad.

    The rest of the bombings took place across Baghdad, in Sadr city, Habibiya, Hurriya, Bayaa, Ur, Shurta, Kadhimiya, Tobji, Shua'ala and Risala neighbourhoods, Reuters news agency reported.

    One of the Baghdad bombings struck near a place where day labourers wait for work in the overwhelmingly Shia area of Sadr City, killing five people and wounding 17, according to AFP.

    A relentless campaign of bombings and shootings has killed nearly 4,000 people in Iraq since the start of the year, according to violence monitoring group Iraq Body Count.

    The violence has raised fears of a return to full-blown conflict in a country where Kurds, Shia and Sunni Muslims have yet to find a stable way of sharing power.

    In July alone, more than 810 people have lost their lives in attacks.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Daughters of al-Shabab

    Daughters of al-Shabab

    What draws Kenyan women to join al-Shabab and what challenges are they facing when they return to their communities?