Banned Tunisian protest leads to clashes

Police prevent demonstration in the capital Tunis by activists who say objectives of revolution have not been met.

    Anti-government protesters in the Tunisian capital have clashed with police as they attempted to protest against what they term nepotism and corruption in the government.

    Hundreds of policemen prevented the protesters from gathering on Sunday, because the interior ministry had banned demonstrations in Tunis for the evening.

    The civil society activists say that the objectives of the revolution in Tunisia have not been realised, and that the country is not on the right track.

    They also argue that corruption and favouritism are still being practiced in the country's administration and ministries.

    The protesters ended up marching up and down the crowded Habib Bourguiba Avenue, in the heart of the city, where many families had gathered to observe the breaking of their fast.

    "We have the right to protest peacefully but the interior ministry banned all demonstrations," said Zied Hechmi, president of the association for young Tunisian medical doctors.

    "It's like in the past. We don't even have the right to express our opinion without being aggressed."

    Ghada Ahmad, another of the protesters, said: "We have to claim the right for an independent judiciary, an independent elections committee and to claim the right for better social and economic situation.

    "We haven't been allowed to gather and to protest. We've been aggressed physically and verbally.

    "The police have attempted to confiscate our cameras and dispersed us with violence."

    SOURCE: Agencies


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