Syria Alawites face mistrust from opposition

Some Alawites working against President Bashar al-Assad, himself an Alawite, are still viewed as spies.

    Syrian activists from the Alawite sect of Shia Islam, many who have been working with the Syrian opposition, have been fleeing across the border to Turkey to escape mistrust in their homeland.

    In some cases, even Alawites who support the Sunni-majority opposition are viewed by their counterparts as spies or agents of the government.  

    According to one Alawite activist living in Turkey, many Alawites have stayed silent out of fear for their lives.

    President Bashar al-Assad, from a prominent Alawite family, often projects himself as protector of the sect and other religious minorities, and warns that they would face discrimination if the opposition is successful.

    The activist said that many Alawites know this is a lie, but can "do nothing".

    Al Jazeera's Anita McNaught reports from Antakya, Turkey.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.