Tensions rise as Dead Sea recedes

Exposure of new land has led to growing friction between Israel, Jordan and the Palestinians.



    Environmentalists in Jordan are warning that the Dead Sea will disappear by the year 2050 if its level continues to drop at the current rate.

    Climate change and increasing water usage has caused the Dead Sea to shrink by a third over the last 50 years.

    Bordering Israel, Jordan and the occupied Palestinian territories, the sea is receding by more than a metre each year. 

    While experts are assessing how best to save it from disappearing altogether, the exposure of new land uncovered by the receding coastline has led to growing friction over who owns the landmark.
     
    Al Jazeera's Tony Birtley reports on the claim that the Dead Sea is now "dying" as the water that used to feed it is diverted for industry, agriculture and domestic use in both Israel and Jordan.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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