Profile: Moussa Koussa



    Moussa Koussa, Libya's former foreign minister who has fled Libya to the UK, was one of the North African country's most influential political figures for three decades and helped transform the country from a pariah state into a Western ally and economic partner.

    He persuaded Muammar Gaddafi to abandon Libya's nuclear weapons programme and also negotiated deals to compensate the families of the victims of the 1988 Lockerbie bombing.

    A former head of Libya's intelligence agency, Koussa's flight is seen as a blow to Gaddafi and a boost for the rebels. He could also provide vital intelligence about the inner workings of the Libyan government.

    Al Jazeera's Nazanine Sadri reports.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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