Iran journalist jailed for one year

Mahsa Amrabadi, who worked for opposition newspaper, gets prison term for "propaganda against the system".

    A government crackdown silenced protests that followed the disputed 2009 presidential poll [GALLO/GETTY]

    Iran has sentenced Mahsa Amrabadi, an Iranian journalist, who worked for the banned pro-opposition newspaper Etemad Melli, to one year in prison for writing anti-government articles.

    A court found Amrabadi guilty of "propaganda against the system by conducting interviews and reports," Kaleme.com, the opposition website reported on Sunday.

    Amrabadi, along with her husband and reformist journalist Masoud Bastani, were arrested after the disputed presidential election of June 2009.

    Hundreds of thousands of opposition supporters defied a government crackdown and poured onto the streets of the capital, Tehran, to protest against the re-election of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iranian president.

    Security forces cracked down on the protesters, arresting and jailing thousands.

    Amrabadi was among scores of reformist figures, political activists, and journalists who were rounded up. She was arrested two days after the June 12 vote, Kaleme.com reported.

    Her husband is currently serving a six-year jail term.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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