Rebels reach truce with Yemen tribe

Houthi rebels and government-backed tribe reach ceasefire deal after days of fighting.

     President Saleh has been pushing for peace
    with the Houthis [AFP]

    The week's clashes have rattled an already fragile truce agreed in February that ended a six-month round of fighting between the rebels and the army, which began in 2004.

    Mohammed Abdulsalam, a Houthi spokesman, told The National newspaperthat the rebels viewed the Bin Aziz tribe and the government of President Ali Abdullah Saleh as one and the same.

    "We are not fighting tribes, [the government] just wanted to give a tribal dimension for the fight and this, of course, will not serve the country but would lead to catastrophe. Bin Aziz is a military leader and has military camps. It is the army which is shelling our people, using tanks and rockets," Abdulsalam said.

    Saleh, who also faces a secessionist movement in the south and the presence of al-Qaeda in his country, has publicly pushed for a peace agreement with the Houthis.

    The fighting took on regional dimensions late last year when it was reportedthat Saudi Arabian jets struck rebel camps inside Yemen after the rebels launched cross-border attacks.

    The Houthis and the Yemeni army have continued to clash, each side blaming the other for violating ceasefires.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Thou Shalt Not Kill: Israel's Hilltop Youth

    Thou Shalt Not Kill: Israel's Hilltop Youth

    Meet the hardline group willing to do anything, including going against their government, to claim land for Israel.