Oil pipeline blown up in Yemen

Tribal fighters attack pipeline in retaliation for army raid on leader's home.

    The attack by tribal fighters targeted what is known as "Kilometre 40" [EPA]
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    The sources said the attack was in retaliation for an army raid on the home of a tribal chief, Sheikh Nasser Gammad bin Dawham, who stood accused of sheltering al-Qaeda members. They gave no details on the raid.

    On June 5, a Yemeni colonel and two soldiers were killed in an attack by suspected al-Qaeda members near the city of Maarib as they travelled in convoy to inspect military forces stationed in the Safar oilfield.

    Yemeni forces have been battling al-Qaeda operatives in Maarib for four days. The government say it aims to catch suspected al-Qaeda fighters believed to be behind the ambush. 

    Tribesmen from Maarib, where al-Qaeda has a strong presence, last month set ablaze two oil pipelines near the Safer fields but the authorities have since repaired the damage.

    Yemen is the ancestral homeland of al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

    The group has suffered setbacks amid US pressure on Sanaa to crack down.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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