Yemen's Houthi truce under scrutiny

Opposition members say Houthis will find it difficult to meet government demands.

    Yemen's defence ministry said this week that the government would stop its war on against Houthi fighters if they were to begin complying with its six conditions.

    Ceasefire terms, presented in August, included removing checkpoints, ending banditry, handing over all military equipment and weapons, and releasing civilians and military personnel.

    But a government official said on Sunday that the ceasefire deal should have included a pledge by the group not to attack neighbouring Saudi Arabia.

    Members of Yemen's political opposition told Al Jazeera that the Houthis will find it difficult to meet government demands for a ceasefire, calling the terms of the truce "unworkable."

    Government officials have said Houthi leaders twice rejected the terms, while Abdul-Malik al-Houthi, the Houthis' leader, said last week that his fighters had twice declared they wanted to end the conflict.

    Hashem Ahelbarra reports from the capital Sanaa.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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