Yemen Houthis free Saudi captive

Fighters hand over one of five captured soldiers as part of ceasefire agreement.

    The Houthis have battled both Saudi forces and
    those of the Yemeni government
     

    Earlier, Sheikh Ali Qarsha, a mediator between the Yemeni authorities and the Houthis, also confirmed to Al Jazeera that the Houthis were committed to handing over the Saudi soldiers.

    Fighting between the Houthi group and Saudi forces has raged since the Yemeni fighters moved into Saudi territory in November.

    Government control

    The six-point ceasefire agreement also calls for Houthi fighters to unblock roads and return territory to government control.

    in depth

     

      Listening Post: Media spotlight on Yemen
      Blog: Yemen: Ceasefire imminent?
      Riz Khan: Yemen, a failed state?
      Video: Ceasefire holds in Yemen
      Video: Yemen's tough al-Qaeda challenge
      Inside Story: Can the West save Yemen?
      Inside Story: Focus on Yemen's future

    The government has moved to extend state control into Houthi-held areas.

    Al-Salami said that Houthi representatives in the committee had helped organise efforts to clear mines and unblock roads, making it possible for the Yemeni army to deploy to the Saudi border region.

     

    The Houthi fighters, whose main battle has been with the Yemeni government, agreed on Thursday to a truce to end a conflict that has raged on and off since 2004, with fighters complaining of social, religious and economic discrimination.

    The ceasefire has proved shaky, with the car of Mohammed al-Qawsi, Yemen's interior ministry undersecretary, came under fire on Friday in the northern city of Saada, hours after the ceasefire was to have officially begun.

     

    The ceasefire itself comes after Western powers ramped up pressure on Yemen to deal with its internal conflicts, which include the Houthis and a secessionist movement in the country's south.

    Riyadh and Western powers fear Yemen may become a failed state and that al-Qaeda could exploit the chaos to use the country as a base for attacks in the region and beyond.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months

    I remember the day … I designed the Nigerian flag

    I remember the day … I designed the Nigerian flag

    In 1959, a year before Nigeria's independence, a 23-year-old student helped colour the country's identity.