Dozens die in Yemeni clashes

At least 30 Houthi fighters killed in renewed fighting in northern city of Saada.

    The rebellion in Yemen has been raging since 2004 [EPA]

    The United Nations has estimated that about 150,000 people have been displaced by instability in Saada province since sporadic fighting broke out in 2004.

    Conflict origins

    The Saada province rebellion began in June 2004 when Husain al-Houthi founded an organisation called Shabab al-Mumineen, the Believing Youth movement, and announced an uprising against the Yemeni government.

    The imam said his vision was to establish Zaydi sharia law to defend his community against discrimination, rather than the constitution brought by the republicans once the Zaydi Imamate was defeated.

    Yahya al-Houthi continued the insurgency soon after his brother Husain's death in June 2005.

    The movement has at times offered to end its struggle, in a region where access to health, education and electricity is extremely limited.

    In a letter sent to Sanaa in 2006 it asked emissaries be sent to discuss terms. "But if injustice continues with killing, destroying, and imprisonment... then the trouble will not be solved, but will become more complicated and the gap will become even wider," the message warned.

    No negotiations have ever taken place, and the capital has continued to attack the rebel movement every summer since 2007.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    More than 2,300 political parties have registered for the largest electoral exercise in the world.

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.