'Sex interview' shocks Saudi Arabia

Officials close Jeddah office of Lebanese TV station after saucy broadcast.

    The divorced father of four spoke to camera from his bedroom in Jeddah about how couples can spice up their sex lives.

    "Everything happens in this room," he said, before launching into descriptions of foreplay techniques and tricks for cruising women on the streets of Jeddah.

    He was arrested soon afterwards and has subsequently begged forgiveness from Saudi society, a report from the Associated Press said.

    Sulaiman al-Jumeii, Abdul-Jawad's lawyer, insists the interview was manipulated, saying his client was not aware in many instances that he was being recorded and that the sex toys were provided by the LBC staff.

    LBC is part-owned by Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, a Saudi billionaire.

    Abdul-Jawad has been charged with publicising vice and lawyers say he may face the death penalty.

    Like many Arab countries, Saudi Arabia prohibits sexually explicit content on television and in newspapers, magazines and books.

    In Beirut, Pierre Daher, who heads LBC, maintained his company's no-comment policy since the controversy erupted and has refused to confirm or deny the closure.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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