Migrant bodies wash up in Yemen

Sixty corpses found on beach after smugglers reportedly push many off boats into sea.

    Migrants risk their lives while trying to escape
    poverty and conflict home [REUTERS]

    In a second incident, MSF workers discovered a group who had made it to shore after their boat capsized. They said they had buried 23 fellow passengers.

    "The boat was stuck almost upside down in the sand, not far from the beach. The fishermen were trying to find survivors underneath but they could not," Said, an MSF worker, said.

    "So I had to dive under. I managed to get in the hull and with God's help, we got two women and a man out safe."

    'Horrific' conditions

    According to the UNHCR, the UN refugee agency, about 32,000 people got safely to Yemen from Somalia between the start of the year and October. At least 230 people had died, and 365 were missing, the agency said last month.

    "A lot of attention has been paid lately to tackling the issue of piracy in the waters off the horn of Africa," Francis Coteur, MSF's head of mission in Yemen, said.

    "Unfortunately, little attention is paid to the drama of the refugees crossing the same waters in horrific conditions. Much more needs to be done to address this issue."

    Conflict in Somalia, drought, and food price rises, have worsened hardships across the horn of Africa, already one of the world's poorest regions.

    SOURCE: Agency


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