Fatah al-Islam families go to Syria

Eleven families of Nahr al-Bared fighters leave Lebanon after weeks of negotiation.

    Eleven families of Fatah al-Islam members were allowed to leave Sidon for Syria [AFP]

    Those who left Sidon comprised Syrian mothers with children and Palestinians living in Syria, the official said.

     

    Bus trip

    Lebanese troops defeated Fatah al-Islam fighters at Nahr al-Bared in September, after fifteen weeks of fighting.

    Dozens of Fatah al-Islam fighters were killed in the crisis, the heaviest internal armed conflict since the end of Lebanon's 1975-1990 civil war.

    Many other Fatah al-Islam fighters were captured while some escaped, such as al-Abssi.

    Early on Wednesday, the families boarded two Lebanese general security buses in front of the al-Arqam Mosque.

    In late August, 25 wives of Fatah al-Islam fighters were evacuated with their children from the besieged Nahr al-Bared camp,

    The evacuation paved the way for the Lebanese army to launch a final assault and take full control of the camp.

    The general security official said the six families that remained in Sidon included four Jordanians that their country refused to receive and two Syrians who did not have the proper documents.

    Sheik Ali al-Youssef of the Palestinian Scholars' Association said contacts were continuing with Jordanian and Syrian officials.

    Also on Wednesday, a Lebanese court sentenced Hani Badr al-Sankari, al-Abssi's son-in-law, to three years imprisonment for falsifying Lebanese identity cards and Palestinian refugee documents, judicial officials said.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months

    I remember the day … I designed the Nigerian flag

    I remember the day … I designed the Nigerian flag

    In 1959, a year before Nigeria's independence, a 23-year-old student helped colour the country's identity.