Fugitives killed in Yemen raid

Security forces say they have killed the man behind an attack on tourists last month.

    Al-Qaeda has been blamed for attacks in Yemen, some predating September 11, 2001 [EPA]

    Al-Raimi was one of the most wanted men in Yemen.

    He escaped from a prison in Sanaa in February 2006 along with a group of other al-Qaeda suspects. Among then was Nasser al-Wehaishi and Jamal Ahmad al-Badawi who are both still at large.

    Al-Wehaishi is also accused of planning the Marib attack in which a car full of explosives was driven into a convoy at a temple on July 2.

    Al-Badawi had been sentenced to death for the bombing of the USS Cole off the southern port of Aden in 2000. He was also on a US list of most-wanted and a $5m reward for his capture had been offered.

    Court hearings


    On Monday, a Yemeni court said verdict in the case of three dozen Yemenis accused of planning or carrying out attacks for al-Qaeda would be issued on November 7.

    According to the charge sheet, they are accused of "forming an armed group with the aim of perpetrating criminal acts ... by attacking foreign residents in Yemen, the clients of a hotel ... and causing explosions targeting vital installations".

    They had also "prepared explosives, booby-trapped cars and weapons for other attacks".

    The prosecution says that the group, accused of being members of the Yemeni branch of al-Qaeda, launched an abortive twin attack in September 2006 on an oil refinery at Marib, and petrol storage tanks at the Dhabba terminal operated by Nexen, a Canadian company, in southeastern Hadramut province.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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