Mosque blast kills 10 in Iraq

Armed men in Diyala province kill 14 people and kidnap the official's four children.

    Two car bombs exploded in the southern
    Iraqi town of Qurna [AFP]

    Earlier on Friday, armed men in Iraq's Diyala province have attacked a police official's house, killing 14 people and kidnapping his four children, according to police sources.
     
    The men attacked the house of colonel Ali Delyan Ahmed, head of police in Baquba, with police saying the colonel's wife and two brothers were among the dead.

    It was not clear if Ahmed was at his house at the time of the attack.
     
    Diyala, a mainly Sunni Arab province with significant Shia and Kurdish populations, has seen some of the worst violence in Iraq since the US-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003.

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    In other violence on Friday, two car bombs exploded at a bus terminal in the southern Iraqi town of Qurna, killing 15 people and wounding 32 people, hospital officials said.
     
    Salim Abdul-Hussein, a taxi driver who witnessed the explosion, said the blasts damaged the terminal and many cars and surrounding shops.
     
    Car bombings are said not to be as common in Iraq's Shia-dominated southern region as they are elsewhere in Iraq.

     

    Also on Friday morning, unknown gunmen speeding by in the northern city of Kirkuk shot and killed Adnan Mahmoud, a soldier, as he drove with his 2-year-old daughter. The child was also killed, police said.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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