Al-Sadr ends parliamentary boycott

Talk of "new beginning" as Shia leader's move signals easing of factional tensions.

    A response to the al-Sadr group's demands from the Iraqi government has helped to end the boycott

    'New beginning'


    Al-Sadr's group announced a boycott at the end of last year to press for a withdrawal of US troops from Iraq and to protest against a meeting between al-Maliki and George Bush, the US president.


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    The al-Sadr movement held a joint news conference on Sunday with members of the Shia Alliance, to which the group belongs, to announce their return to parliament.


    Bahaa al-Araji, a senior member of the al-Sadr group, said: "Since there has been a response to our demands, we declare that we will attend parliament today."


    Mahmoud al-Mashadani, a parliamentary speaker, said that all the parliamentary parties would form a committee to discuss the reasons for the boycott in an attempt to resolve the issues.


    "This is a new beginning," he said. "We want to say to the world that an Iraqi solution for Iraqi problems is the key, and others must support these solutions."

    SOURCE: Agencies.


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