Hope in the search for Indigenous remains in a Canadian landfill

On snow-patched ground outside in Manitoba, a woman — bundled in a white beanie hat and a long plaid coat — stands beside a large red sign that reads, "Search the Landfill."
Melissa Robinson has been helping to lead the fight to search the Prairie Green Landfill for her cousin Morgan Harris's remains [Jenn Allen/Al Jazeera]
Melissa Robinson has been helping to lead the fight to search the Prairie Green Landfill for her cousin Morgan Harris's remains [Jenn Allen/Al Jazeera]

Winnipeg, Canada – Temperatures have started to dip below freezing again, and snow now blankets the grasslands of Manitoba, a province in midwestern Canada.

Still, they remain. For nearly a year, demonstrators have gathered outside two landfills near Winnipeg, the provincial capital, to push for the recovery of Indigenous remains believed to be buried among the debris.

But morale among the demonstrators has lifted. After months of inaction, a recent election has reignited hopes that the bodies of three missing women might finally return home.

In October, Manitoba became the first Canadian province to elect a First Nations premier, Wab Kinew.

He campaigned on searching the landfills for the missing women, something his predecessor Heather Stefanson refused to do.

“I do believe that he'll do it. And I do believe we will bring these women home,” said Jorden Myran, whose sister's remains are believed to be at one of the landfills.

Source: Al Jazeera