Campaigners push for 'conflict-free' phones

Efforts under way to ensure that phones are not made with metals mined in conflict-ridden countries.

    A huge number of phones and electronic items are made with metals from mines in conflict-ridden countries, but campaigners in Europe are looking to end this trade.

    Like conflict diamonds, conflict minerals are mined in some of the most violent and corrupt places in the world such as the Democratic Republic of Congo where five million people have died over 10 years.

    Without the money made from mining gold, tungsten and tantalum there would be far fewer weapons in the conflict.

    While in the US there is a law that demands manufacturers show proof of where their metals come from, there is no rule in the European Union. But Intel has promised a conflict-free supply by 2016 and another social enterprise group Fairphone has started making its own conflict-free phones.

    Al Jazeera's Tim Friend reports from Amsterdam.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    How the art world's hunger for ancient artefacts is destroying a centuries-old culture. A journey across the Himalayas.