Italian phone giant fined in market probe

Telecom Italia receives $135m fine, as anti-trust ruling sets tone for future merger talks.

    Italian phone giant fined in market probe
    Telecom Italia has rung up huge debts, and potential merger talks remain on the line [GALLO/GETTY]

    Telecom Italia has been fined $135 million by Italy's anti-trust agency, which alleged that the telecomms giant abused its market position.

    The Italian telecommunications company, which employs more than 84,000 people, was reported to have used its dominance in the market to limit wholesale and retail access to its fixed-line network, hampering the phone and broadband business expansion efforts of competitors.

    The company's discount policy was also unfair to competition, said regulators on Friday, after a two-year investigation.

    Telecom Italia said it would appeal the decision, "confident" that it could "prove the fairness of its practices". Corporate officials said the company had always assured alternative operators "full and equal access to its network".

    After Telecom Italia's stock hit a 15-year low of just 54 cents a share last month, executives have been examining the potential of a merger of its mobile phone business with Hutchison's Three Italia network. If the deal were to overcome any regulatory obstacles, the combined carrier would hold around 45 per cent of the country's mobile market.

    Shedding jobs

    Whether today's ruling against Telecom Italia has any effect on the merger talks remains to be seen.

    "Contacts between Telecom Italia and 3 Italia on possible business combinations are still very preliminary and of an exploratory nature," a Hutchison spokesperson said yesterday.

    Telecom Italia's $37.4bn net debt is reportedly a cause for concern for the company, a person familiar with the matter told Bloomberg.

    The former monopoly is reportedly shedding jobs and assets in a bid to generate cash ahead of a special board meeting scheduled for May 23, after first quarter sales dropped to $8.8 billion from $9.5 billion a year previously.


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    How the art world's hunger for ancient artefacts is destroying a centuries-old culture. A journey across the Himalayas.