UK denies 'right-to-die' legal challenge

Britain's High Court has rejected an attempt by a man who has locked-in syndrome to overturn country's euthanasia law.

    Britain's High Court has rejected an attempt by a man who has locked-in syndrome to overturn the country's euthanasia law by refusing to legally allow doctors to end his life.

    Tony Nicklinson had a stroke in 2005 that left him unable to speak or move below his neck. He requires constant care and communicates mostly by blinking, although his mind has remained unaffected and his condition is not terminal.

    In January, the 58-year-old asked the High Court to declare that any doctor who kills him with his consent will not be charged with murder.

    Judges told Nicklinson that the decision to allow him to die was a matter for the British parliament to decide.

    Nicklinson, who did not take the news well, said he will appeal the decision.

    Al Jazeera's Laurence Lee reports from London.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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