Schmallenberg virus worrying Europe's farmers

Virus which leads to deaths and deformities of livestock during pregnancy spreading across continent.

    The Schmallenberg virus, named after a town in Germany, has become a cause for concern for farmers in Europe.

    It is thought animals are infected with the virus when pregnant, by being bitten by tiny flues common to farms across Europe, called midges.

    One farmer lost around 80 animals over the winter period due to either miscarriages or deformations caused by the virus.

    If they have the virus, the animals can suffer from major abnormalities, their heads pointing backwards, or their feet splayed in such a way that they cannot be born.

    Al Jazeera’s Nick Spicer reports from southern Germany.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeeera


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