Norway suspect considered other targets

Police say Anders Breivik told them he had considered attacks in other places, as memorial concert takes place in Oslo.

     Sixty-nine people were killed at a summer camp on the island of Utoya [GALLO/GETTY]

    Anders Behring Breivik, who has confessed to the Oslo bombing and youth camp massacre that killed 77 people in Norway, has told police that he considered attacks at other possible locations.

    Paal-Fredrik Hjort Kraby, a police lawyer, said on Saturday that Breivik told officers "he was interested in other targets" following ten hours of questioning on Friday

    VG, a Norwegian tabloid, said Breivik had described the royal palace and the head office of the prime minister's labour party in Oslo as potential targets. The police would not confirm the reports.

    Without mentioning any targets, Kraby said: "They were targets that one would say are natural for terror attacks."

    Al Jazeera's Tania Page, reporting from Oslo, said: "[The police] are looking for the CCTV footage, that is all of the closed circuit television footage, so basically security footage from around the city on the day of the attacks last Friday as they are trying to piece together his [Breivik's] movements."

    Breivik is continuing to co-operate with the police investigation.

    Memorial concert

    The announcement from the police came as hundreds of mourners continued to attend funerals for victims of the massacre.

    A memorial concert took place at Oslo's main cathedral on Saturday where rescuers and politicians, particularly those from the ruling labour party attended.

    Survivors, victims and their bereaved families also have attended the concert that was broadcast on Norwegian television. 

    "It is really providing something of a vocal point for mourners," Page said.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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