Turkey faces up to its past

One of the proposed constitutional amendments lifts immunity from prosecution that the military granted itself.

    Thirty years on from the country's last and most brutal military coup, Turkey is facing up to its past.

    With more then 17,000 extrajudicial killings, and more than 1,500 people still missing, the military has forcefully protected a self-granted immunity from prosecution.

    That is, until now.

    One of the proposed constitutional amendments in the referendum lifts that protection.

    A survey in Turkey shows that nearly six out of every 10 voters will back the constitutional changes proposed by the government.

    However, the polls also show that a good number remain undecided.

    Al Jazeera's Anita McNaught reports from Ankara.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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