Portugal passes gay marriage bill

Same-sex marriages approved but proposal to let gay couples adopt children is rejected.

    Gay activists celebrated the parliament vote by eating wedding cake and drinking champagne [AFP]

    'Natural step'

    Jose Socrates, the prime minister, said the aim of the legislation was to remedy decades of injustice towards gays, recalling that as recently as 1982 homosexuality was a crime in Portugal.

    "This is a step that will seem completely natural in the near future, in the same way that gender equality, abortion rights and unmarried couples living together are normal now."

    Jose Socrates,
    Prime Minister

    "I am of a generation - as we all are - which is not proud of  the way it treated homosexuals," he said.

    "This is a step that will seem completely natural in the near future, in the same way that gender equality, abortion rights and unmarried couples living together are normal now."

    Meanwhile, parliament rejected a proposal to allow gay couples to adopt children.

    The Left Bloc and Green Party said that by not allowing gay and lesbian couples to adopt, the government was effectively making them second-class citizens.

    Defending the government's decision to exclude adoption rights from the gay marriage bill, Socrates said the issues at stake were different.

    "Adoption is a different matter from marriage, because adoption does not only involve free, consenting adults. Adoption is not a couple's right, it is the child's right," he said.

    Limited opposition

    Despite Portugal being a relatively conservative Roman Catholic country, the bill in provoked only muted opposition even from the political right.

    This stands in contrast to neighbouring Spain, where the run-up to the legalisation of gay marriage in 2005 brought hundreds of thousands of demonstrators onto the streets,

    A recent poll showed voters in Portugal were fairly split on the issue of on gay marriage, with 49.5 per cent against and 45.5 per cent in favour. 

    The same survey by the Eurosondagem institute showed a clear majority (68.4 per cent) of Portuguese opposed to adoptions by same-sex couples.

    In 2001, a law allowed "civil unions" between same-sex couples which granted them certain legal, tax and property rights. However, it did not allow couples to take their partner's name, inherit their possessions nor their state pension, which is permitted in marriages.

    Gay marriage is currently permitted in Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Norway, Canada and South Africa and in six US states.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    The US exaggerating and obsessing about foreign threats seems quite similar to what is happening in Russia.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months